Classifying gait alterations using an instrumented smart sock and deep learning

In collaboration with other colleagues at Nottingham Trent University and the University of Nottingham, the ATRG have published a new research article ‘Classifying gait alterations using an instrumented smart sock and deep learning’. The article describes the measurement of gait using two sock that incorporate a series of three E-yarns embedded with accelerometers each. Machine learning was then used to identify gait patterns linked to different movement disorders. Such a sock may prove to be useful for clinicians to monitor gait pattern alterations remotely during gait rehabilitation. The article was published in the IEEE Sensors Journal and is available here.

E-textiles 2022

Members of the ATRG recently attended E-Textiles 2022 (4th International Conference on the Challenges, Opportunities, Innovations and Applications in Electronic Textiles), where the ATRG had an exhibition stand disseminating work from the project. The conference was held in Nottingham this year. Members of the ATRG team were involved in the local organising committee including Dr Arash Shahidi (pictured), Kalana Marasinghe, and Dr Theo Hughes-Riley (who was the conference chair). More details on the conference can be found on the official website.

9th Forum on New Materials

Dr Hughes-Riley was recently in Perugia (Italy) as he was invited to speak at the 9th Forum on New Materials, which was part of CIMTEC 2022. He presented on ‘Energy harvesting and storage with electronic textiles’, with his presentation focussing on recent developments by the ATRG into the development of woven textile solar panels.

Research dissemination in the USA

Dr Hughes-Riley recently visited the Pacific Northwest in the United States of America. During the trip he visited DXARTS and Professor Afroditi Psarra at the University of Washington in Seattle, where he had the opportunity to present the work of the ATRG to the E-textiles and Wearables class.

Dr Hughes-Riley also visited Adidas in Portland (Oregon). The ARTG have collaborated with Adidas in the past and this was an opportunity to share our recent research with them.

3rd International Conference on the Challenges, Opportunities, Innovations and Applications in Electronic Textiles

Members of the ATRG with the exhibition stand at the 3rd International Conference on the Challenges, Opportunities, Innovations and Applications in Electronic Textiles.

Research from the project was recently presented as part of an exhibition booth and poster presentations at the ‘3rd International Conference on the Challenges, Opportunities, Innovations and Applications in Electronic Textiles’ in Manchester, UK. Dr Arash Shahidi presented a poster entitled ‘Development of a manufacturing process for a robust electronic yarn’ which focussed on the recent developments made in enhancing the durability of the core E-yarn and the current E-yarn manufacturing process. Nour Nashed’s poster, ‘Finite element analysis of the mechanical stresses on the core structure of electronically functional yarns’, explored using finite element modelling to optimise the resin encapsulation of components in E-yarns to improve durability. The E-textile conference is hosted by the EPSRC funded E-textiles network. Now in it’s third year the conference brings academics and member of industry together to discuss challenges and opportunities in the field. More information on the conference series is available here.

Vibration-Sensing Electronic Yarns for the Monitoring of Hand Transmitted Vibrations

The ATRG have published a new research article on the development of a vibration sensing electronic yarn. The article ‘Vibration-Sensing Electronic Yarns for the Monitoring of Hand Transmitted Vibrations’ focusses on the characterisation of the electronic yarn for a range of vibration amplitudes and frequencies that are relevant to hand transmitted vibrations at each stage of the production process; as a soldered component (accelerometer), when encapsulated, as a final yarn, and once in a fabric. The work presents a vibration sensing glove that is capable of taking vibration measurements at both the palm of the hand and on the index finger. The article was published in Sensors and is available here.

Wearable Technology Show

Research from the project was recently presented as part of a virtual booth at the Wearable Technology Show. In addition to the virtual booth, Dr Hughes-Riley was also invited to speak as part of the event and presented on recent advances made in the automated E-yarn production process as well as various innovations developed using the E-yarn technology. The Wearable Technology Show, which focusses on innovation in wearables, has run for eight years and further details on the event are available here.

Shoelaces that light up to increase safety for joggers and cyclists

The ATRG in collaboration with project partner QinetiQ have designed shoelaces that light up and flash. It is envisioned that the laces could improve safety for joggers and cyclists at night by increasing their visibility. The laces, shown above, each contain 24 LEDs, with the flashing pattern controlled by a small microcontroller discretely integrated into a silicone pod at the side of the shoe that also includes the battery. This research has been heavily reported on by the media, including major national newspapers such as the Daily Mail and The Times.

Webinar on methods for integrating electronics to create E-textiles

Dr Hughes-Riley recently presented a webinar on different methods of electronics integration used to create E-textiles. The webinar was part of the E-textiles Network webinar series and a recording of the webinar is available online here.

The talk introduces different techniques to manufacture electronic textiles, discussing their different characteristics and potential advantages or disadvantages. Methods for testing and characterising E-textiles are also discussed.

Review of Solar Electronic Textiles

Members of the ATRG have recently published a review article on solar energy harvesting textiles. The article ‘A Review of Solar Energy Harvesting Electronic Textiles‘ focusses on the textile aspects of solar textiles, highlighting different textile properties and durability testing that has been conducted in the literature. The review has been written to be accessible and includes an introduction and overview to other forms of textile energy harvesting as well as the fundamentals of how solar cells work. The article was published in Sensors and is available here.